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Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy (PEG)

A percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) is a surgical procedure to install a feeding tube into your stomach. A PEG involves a thin lighted instrument called an endoscope being inserted into your stomach through your mouth in order to determine the position of the feeding tube that will be inserted through a small incision in your abdomen. If you have a disorder that impairs your ability to swallow or you will be unable to consume food orally for an extended period of time, contact Dr. Cofrancesco or Dr. Quijano to discuss the possibility of the a PEG procedure to insert a feeding tube.

To learn more about feeding tubes and the PEG procedure continue reading below.

  • What is percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy?
  • When is percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy used?
  • How should I prepare for percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy?
  • How is percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy performed?
  • What is the recovery from percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy?
  • What are the risks associated with percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy?
  • Points to Remember

What is percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy?

A percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) is a surgical procedure in which a tube for feeding is placed into your stomach or small intestine through a surgical hole in the abdomen. The tube provides food and fluids directly into the stomach if you are unable to consume food orally for a long period of time.

When is percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy used?

If you are unable to swallow or have another other condition that restricts you from consuming food orally, a PEG may be used to provide the means for you to receive necessary nutrition.

Furthermore, a PEG is a less invasive option than open abdomen surgery (laparotomy).

How should I prepare for percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy?

You should not eat or drink anything for eight hours before the procedure. If you take any medication such as blood thinners (such as Coumadin, Persantine, or Ticlid) or anti-inflammatory drugs (such as ibuprofen, Advil, Motrin, or Naprosyn) you should alert Dr. Cofrancesco or Dr. Quijano. The use of such drugs may need to be suspended for as much as one week before the procedure.

Also, if you use insulin for diabetes, Dr. Cofrancesco or Dr. Quijano may adjust your dosage the day of the test.

Do not discontinue the use of any medication without speaking with Dr. Cofrancesco or Dr. Quijano first.

You will not be able to drive yourself home after the procedure. Arrangements for transportation home should be made prior to the procedure.

How is percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy performed?

Anesthesia will administer a sedative and a pain reliever to keep you relaxed during the procedure. Dr. Cofrancesco or Dr. Quijano will then place a small lighted endoscope in your mouth and extend it into your stomach in order to determine where to place the feeding tube. Next, a small hole (or gastrostomy) is made in the abdomen wall. Finally, a needle is inserted in the incision into your stomach and the feeding tube is pushed through the needle. Dr. Cofrancesco or Dr. Quijano then secures the tube to your abdomen wall.

What is the recovery time from percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy?

You will experience some draining around the feeding tube for a few days after the procedure. You may also experience pain and soreness in the abdomen wall. Dr. Cofrancesco. Dr. Quijano, and the staff at GI North will provide you with instructions for using, cleaning, and maintaining your tube.

What are the risks associated with percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy?

While risks such as infection around the tube insertion site as well as blockage or leaking of the tube do exist, the percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy carries less risk that performing an open abdominal surgery known as a laparotomy. Other possible side effects include infection, aspiration, bleeding, or inadvertent/unintended puncture of another organ.

Points to Remember

  • In a PEG, Dr. Cofrancesco or Dr. Quijano inserts an endoscope through your mouth and into your stomach to determine the precise location for the feeding tube that will be inserted through a small incision in the abdomen.
  • The feeding tube allows patients that suffer from an inability to swallow or consume food orally to receive nutrition.
  • During your consultation, you should let Dr. Cofrancesco or Dr. Quijano know all medications that you take. He will create a specific plan for you regarding your medication schedule and your procedure.
  • All use of anti-inflammatory drugs containing aspirin should be discontinued for at least a week prior to your procedure. You should not consume any food or liquid for eight hours before the procedure.
  • You will be given a sedative and a pain killer immediately before the procedure.
  • While there are some risks associated with a PEG, the procedure carries less risk than an open abdominal procedure.

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