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Increase In Inflammatory Bowel Disease Among Americans

photo of young woman lying on couch holding her stomach in pain | GI NorthAt present, about 1 – 1.3 million people suffer from Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD), affirms the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Although the cause is unknown, there is an understanding how IBD affects some subpopulations more than others. For instance, Crohn’s disease is more common in woman than men and Ulcerative Colitis is a little more common in men that women. Studies also show that IBD occurs more in Caucasian and Ashkenazic Jewish origin than other ethnicities. However, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention states that there is no precise understanding of how many people suffer from ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease. This is because there is a lack of standard criteria for diagnosing IBD. Quite often, IBD is identified as another condition.

Environmental conditions also play a factor in IBD statistics. For example, IBD is more prevalent in developed countries. As well, IBD is more prevalent in urban communities compared with rural areas. Many experts claim that is may be due to a “westernization” lifestyle. As well, Crohn’s disease is found more often in smokers and ulcerative colitis is more common with ex-smokers and nonsmokers.

There have also been studies on the relationship between socioeconomic factors and IBD. Some research showed that Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) is more common in white collar occupations. Other studies revealed that ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease was less prevalent in groups with higher income and education. As well, other research found a slight connection between IBD and specific occupations.

Other factors that may be contributing to the increase of inflammatory bowl disease are perinatal and childhood infections, diet, atypical mycobacterial infections and oral contraceptives. However, these factors have not been proven to play a part in developing IBD.

Symptoms and Treatment

Inflammatory bowl disease symptoms depend on the area of the intestinal tract being affected. However, the symptoms are not always specific and can fluctuate from mild to severe. According to WebMD the symptoms of the IBD can include:

  • Fever
  • Sweats
  • Weight loss
  • Possible fatigue
  • Diminished appetite
  • Diarrhea with possible blood
  • Abdominal pain and cramping
  • Severe need to have a bowel movement
  • Iron deficiency (anemia) from blood loss
  • Arthralgias (non-inflammatory joint pain)
  • Bloody stools – common in UC, less common in CD
  • Perianal disease (abscesses, fistulas) – Fifty percent of CD patients

If you suspect that you have either Crohn’s disease (CD) or ulcerative colitis (UC), it is best that you seek the advice of a professional. At GI North, gastroenterologists Dr. Cofrancesco and Dr. Quijano are renowned for their expertise and outstanding patient care.

Combined, the two physicians bring numerous years of experience, specializing in the diagnoses and treatment of digestive issues such as IBD. As well, Dr. Quijano speaks fluent Spanish. Also, the highly trained, friendly professional staff is committed to providing the highest quality in service and personal care.

The staff’s expertise and passion for every patient’s well-being easily creates a trusting and warm environment for everyone. Moreover, the staff is more than happy to answers any questions or concerns you may have.

For easy accessibility, GI North serves Cumming, GA as well as the surrounding areas of Alpharetta, Canton, Dawsonville, Duluth, Milton, Johns Creek, Suwanee and Roswell.

Note: This article is not meant to replace professional medical advice. If you have any questions or concerns about Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD), make an appointment at GI North with Dr. Cofrancesco, Dr. Quijano, or a physician in your area.

© 2016 GI North Gastroenterology Services. All rights reserved.

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